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Home » Wonders Of Science (128 Papers)

the science of everyday life
There are twenty-four short stories in the non-fiction book The Science of Everyday Life. The short stories found in this book highlight and explain such wonders and curiosities such as why you blink, why women take longer to use the washroom and other curiosities of daily life. This book is generally useful and has many applications for the different grade levels of science. For example, for grade nine, the Sweet Thoughts from a Tiny Brain would be a quite interesting story. This story of ... There are twenty-four short stories in the non-fiction book The Science of Everyday Life. The short stories found in this book highlight and explain such wonders and curiosities such as why you blink, why women take longer to use the washroom and other curiosities of daily life. This book is generally useful and has many applications for the different grade levels of science. ... To conclude, I recommend The Science of Everyday Life for teaching, for use as a reference in making science more exciting, or for general pleasure reading. Overall, this book would make science more enjoyable a... Wordcount: 856 Pages: 3
Pursuit of Rationalism and Science at the Expense of Humanism: Analysis of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Since its inception in 1818, the novel "Frankenstein" had radically altered the horror genre of literature, for it introduced the horrors of humanity as a result of using science to attain power and control beyond humanity's capabilities-that is, humans creating humans through scientific, not natural, production. Author Mary Shelley had introduced the theme of humanity's pursuit of rationalism and science to illustrate the state of society as she experienced it in 19th century: a society that ... Evidently, "Frankenstein" is a novel that depicted the opposing nature of science and humanism. ... Cultivating a humane and moral society, for Shelley, was most important than the social and intellectual progresses associated with science. ... This paper reflects how objectivism resulted to the Creature, Frankenstein's creation made possible through science, and its wrath against humanity. ... The theme of science versus humanism was evident in the transitional phases that Frankenstein had in the novel. ... The demise of both Frankenstein and the Creature showed that humanism and mo... Wordcount: 1158 Pages: 5 Bibliography
engineering
Engineering Engineering is a fundamental field of research and creation. Engineering originated in Europe and has spread throughout the world ever since. Big contributions to engineering have not mainly come from we, "The Americans," but from people across seas, such as the Europeans. This paper is to recognize these big contributions to engineering from around the world. "This country has imported theories from abroad and concentrated on its application to concrete and immediate prob ... Instead Americans have showed how to apply pure science to engineering. ... The Americans applied pure science to come up with the Atom bomb. ... Engineering is basically a trilogy which contains: "pure science, applied science, engineering;" "economic theory, finance and engineering;" "and third, social relations, industrial relations, engineering.... Babylonian engineers helped to build one of the Seven Wonders of the World, the hanging gardens of Babylon. ... Its lighthouse is made of marble and is called one of the Seven Wonders of the World. ... Wordcount: 1809 Pages: 7
Fear in a Test-tube
Fear in a Test Tube Cloning, genetically tailoring offspring, and creating the "perfect human" were all advances in science that seemed unattainable yet desirable. People were amazed by the myth of genetically altering DNA, and daydreamed of the day that they themselves could create another living being out of a test tube. Mary Shelley"s Frankenstein paved the way for people to imagine and believe this way. Dr. Frankenstein"s animation of his creature allowed people to fathom and marvel a ... Fear in a Test Tube Cloning, genetically tailoring offspring, and creating the "perfect human" were all advances in science that seemed unattainable yet desirable. ... Frankenstein"s animation of his creature allowed people to fathom and marvel at the wonders of creating life. ... This is paralleled to modern times" fear of cloning, as science replacing God. ... Wordcount: 313 Pages: 1
The birthmark
Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote a time of great change in America. In the mid-nineteenth century, Americans began to experience a shift in focus from the once stringent religious outlook to a more scientific view of the world and its natural wonders. Americans, however, did look at these new scientific discoveries with much hesitation, questioning their long-term effects on society as a whole. Hawthorne" s work, "The Birth Mark echoes these sentiments and combine natural faith with a confidence i ... In the mid-nineteenth century, Americans began to experience a shift in focus from the once stringent religious outlook to a more scientific view of the world and its natural wonders. ... Hawthorne" s work, "The Birth Mark echoes these sentiments and combine natural faith with a confidence in science to make a very interesting tale. ... "As Aylmer tries to use science to alter nature, or in this case, the birthmark on his wife"s cheek, his plan backfires and his wife dies. ... The influence of the evolution of culture has caused men to educate themselves, and learn extensive amoun... Wordcount: 555 Pages: 2
Sagan
The New Education There is a bed in Seattle which is nestled in North America on the spinning Earth led by the Sun around the Milky Way, a speck of cosmic dust floating in the Universe. On this bed Carl Sagan died of an obscure disease for which there is no cure. Carl Sagan is a celebrated writer and astronomer, but most remembered for his writings. Like Galileo he brought the beauty of science to the people. He is the writer of 'Cosmos', an award winning television mini-serie ... Like Galileo he brought the beauty of science to the people. He is the writer of 'Cosmos', an award winning television mini-series that brought the wonders of astronomy into the home. ... This only breeds paranoia and hate for science in the minds of the public. ... The power of his writing is its ability to teach the average man of the wonders around him in and easy to understand, non-confrontational manner. From this education we will learn to be critical of science and not shun it. ... Wordcount: 1756 Pages: 7
Technology1
As we wake our way into the new Millenium, scientists are becoming more aware of the new advancements in society technologically. Keeping up to date is mandatory, because the more breakthroughs there are; the more pressure scientists have, politically, financially, and socially. Will the Canadian dollar ever rise in value? This is one of the major financial pressures scientists have to day. Importing major key items is our problem because our dollar is not equivalent to our neighbor"s (U.S. ... A plan to build a model half the size could not be introduced until 2004, but the scientist wonders if the idea would have already been taken. ... Science is becoming more popular. More people want to learn in the field of science. ... Wordcount: 508 Pages: 2
Roman Achievements
Where would the world be today without the founding of the Roman Household and the idea of paterfamilias, advances in science and medicine, and the many changes in Christianity and marriage practices? It is hard to imagine what our society would be like without a "head" of the household, medicine for illness, science for technology, and Christianity along with marriage practices. The Romans made many advances in science and medicine. Archimedes of Syracuse founded the formulas of spheres and ... Where would the world be today without the founding of the Roman Household and the idea of paterfamilias, advances in science and medicine, and the many changes in Christianity and marriage practices? It is hard to imagine what our society would be like without a "head" of the household, medicine for illness, science for technology, and Christianity along with marriage practices. The Romans made many advances in science and medicine. ... They were able to build engines and bombs for war, ways of transportation, and many other industrial wonders. ... With all of these advances i... Wordcount: 876 Pages: 4
tradition vs modern
The terms 'traditional¡ and 'modern¡ are so often used in conversation, and also in reference to Society, that it is a good exercise to consider what these terms do mean in a comparative light. Berman in All that is solid melts in air puts forward an interesting set of ideas in the comment that people who live in traditional ways, or in modern ones, can almost be said to occupy different states of mind. For instance, a full 500 years have passed since some peoples first met up with the inf ... The social sciences make use of the terms, Traditional vs. ... Modernity would seem to be an abstract concept too, however, for one wonders just how free individuals living in complex societies are, in relation to their fellows who still dwell in traditional societies. ... Given that the influences of the modern world are so irregular in the different ways in which they shape the traditional societies to which they are exposed, one wonders if such a definite line can be drawn between these two sets of concepts. In summary, it seems to be that the split between the modern and the traditional ... Wordcount: 1952 Pages: 8
The Childs Need For Magic
Reading this excerpt The Childs Need for Magic by Bruno Bettleheim, reminded me of some of the joys of my childhood. Dreaming about knights and dragons, reading about gingerbread houses, and watching movies about lion kings and jungle books. I wonder what I would be like today had I not been exposed to these childhood wonders. I feel that Bettleheim is correct, and that "magic" helps develop children into healthy, well-adjusted adults. I have never really put any thought into this subject be ... I wonder what I would be like today had I not been exposed to these childhood wonders. ... I feel that as children grow up in a big and scary world, cartoons and fairy tales can often provide an explanation and rationalization for science, principles, and social behaviors. ... Wordcount: 335 Pages: 1
The New Gold
Through out time scientists have been fascinated by the wonders and creations of earth. From minerals to natural resources theses marvels had mesmerized people through out the centuries. One major factor in this is the discovery of elements and how everything is put together. It takes time and effort to discover and take data on these elements the one in particular will be spoken of is Platinum. Julius Scaliger discovered platinum in 1735. The origin is from the Spanish word platina, which mean ... Through out time scientists have been fascinated by the wonders and creations of earth. ... (Earth Science for Students, 121) Platinum is a beautiful precious, silver-white metal that is even more valuable than gold. ... Wordcount: 398 Pages: 2
William Henry Perkin Letter to Grand children
William Henry Perkin 1 Perkin Medal Way Greenford Green, Britain 12345 October 31, 1906 Dear my Sweetest Grandchildren, Hello, I am you Grandfather William Perkin. I know you must be wondering who I am and why you are receiving this letter. I am your mother"s Father. I gave her this letter to give to you in case I died before you were born. I wanted to let you know who I was as a person and what my life was like. To start off I was born on March 12, 1838 in England. I was a very cu ... When I learned about the wonders of chemistry I was attending school at the City of London School. ... When I was fifteen he told me I was ready to attend the Royal College of Science. ... I was wealthy enough to be able to retire and return to pure science, that I sold my company Perkin & Sons in 1874. Even though I wanted to return to pure science, I had really been working with it all through the time I was working on the dyes. ... Wordcount: 836 Pages: 3
greek civ vs the rest
Greek Civ versus Roman Civ Today"s society in which we live in has based itself on the past achievements and failures of previous civilizations which rose and fell with the hands of time. Every one of those civilizations made certain contributions to history as well as developing human intellectuality in order to enhance its chances of becoming the supreme ruler of our planet"s resources. If we look back in history right now we can say that every single mishap, ... Hot water piping, beautiful architecture and excellent highways were amongst its many wonders. Architectural wonders such as the circus Maximus are still available to be seen today. ... It carried forward the tradition of rational, secular speculation in natural philosophy and science, but turned its attention more to human questions in medicine and ethical and political philosophy. ... Kagan, Greek science after Aristotle (1977) ... Wordcount: 1260 Pages: 5
Philip K. Dick
In the following essay, I will analyze Philip K. Dick's short story titled "Blade Runner". "Blade Runner" is a science fiction story about the not to distant future. In my analysis, I will use two non-fiction essays, Sonia Maasik's and Jack Solomon's "Interpreting Popular Signs" and Mike Nordberg's "Science Fiction: A Mirror to Our Universe". Both of the essays are about hidden messages in science fiction. Are there secret messages about the present in science fiction stories? In "Science ... "Blade Runner" is a science fiction story about the not to distant future. ... Both of the essays are about hidden messages in science fiction. Are there secret messages about the present in science fiction stories? ... Rick wonders how that could be and Bill tells him its because of the highest quality plasma. ... Science fiction stories are supposed to be make-believe. ... Wordcount: 1310 Pages: 5
Mesopotamia: The cradle of civilization?
Civilization is defined as "a advanced state of intellectual, cultural, and material development in human society, marked by progress in the arts and sciences, the extensive use of record-keeping, including writing, and the appearance of complex political and social institutions." (The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 2000) Often called the cradle of civilization, Mesopotamia or "the land between the rivers" is thought by many to be the birthplace of what we know today as c ... Civilization is defined as "a advanced state of intellectual, cultural, and material development in human society, marked by progress in the arts and sciences, the extensive use of record-keeping, including writing, and the appearance of complex political and social institutions.... The advancements in science and technology, politics, social structures and art that the people of Mesopotamia achieved were unprecedented and laid the foundation of many civilizations that followed. By reviewing the wonders that the Mesopotamians were able accomplish with no precedent set before them, one cou... Wordcount: 753 Pages: 3 Bibliography
beef
What is Europe's Beef About Our Beef? Right now Europe is fighting for the right to refuse to import beef from the U.S. and Canada that has been grown with the aid of artificial hormones. The purpose of these hormones is to force the livestock to grow in a rapid, unnatural way. Beef has been grown this way in North America for some time, and is sold with no special labeling. Here, meats that have been raised with artificial hormones are allowed to be labelled "All Natural." It is safe to a ... This logic is so obvious, that one wonders why it is not considered an acceptable argument one nation may use to prohibit the sale of such meat. ... Of course, it would be bad science to assume that this is because we are consuming beef with artificial hormones. However, if it is evident that we have more health problems than those in nations that do not consume these substances, it would be bad science to dismiss them as a possible factor. ... Wordcount: 813 Pages: 3
The Lost World 2
The lost world was written to entice the minds of nonbelievers. Michael Crichton the author shows what could happen if science was to progress to such a high height. A few scientists go looking for an island where supposedly these are live dinosaurs. Once on the island the adventurers find out that they are truly in for adventure of a lifetime. In the book some of the dinosaurs can be gentle while other are ferocious killers. Ian Malcom, Dr Levine and Arby the boy genius are the main c ... Michael Crichton the author shows what could happen if science was to progress to such a high height. ... The surgeons have done wonders, as they will be the first to tell you. ... Wordcount: 652 Pages: 3
George Washington Carver
George Washington Carver was a pioneer in ecology. When Carver was a young boy he wanted to know about every thing in God"s creation. He believed that everything in the natural world is part of one great whole. And when he became professor at the Tuskegee Institute Carver taught his students how to work with nature to make worn-out farmland productive. George Carver said, "I am a blazer of trails." He made people respect nature"s design. He knew that he work wasn"t an end, but it ... George Washington Carver gave much to science. ... He didn"t want fame, but he wanted to learn all he could about the wonders of God and God"s creation. ... Wordcount: 582 Pages: 2
Frankenstein 5
Mary Shelley"s, Frankenstein, was written during a period of dramatic revolution. The failed French Revolution and Industrial Revolution seriously mark the novel with hints of moral and scientific revolution. Through Frankenstein, Shelley sends out a clear message that morally irresponsible scientific development can unleash a monster that can destroy its creator. Upon beginning the creation process, Victor Frankenstein uses the scientific advances of others to infiltrate the role of nature. ... The process is merely scientific, "I beheld the corruption of death succeed to the blooming cheek of life; I saw how the worm inherited the wonders of the eye and brain"(51). ... Frankenstein never questions the ethics in creating a new life, he simply uses science.... Wordcount: 543 Pages: 2
Mechanical Engineers
A mechanical engineer is a person that, for example, looks at a car and says, "What makes it go?" or "What could make it go faster?" Looking at things and wondering why things do the things they do, that makes a great mechanical engineer. That"s just what a mechanical engineer does; he or she looks at things and wonders what is in the car and how they can improve how it works. This is the way that I think and that"s why I want to become a mechanical engineer. The nature of their work consists ... That"s just what a mechanical engineer does; he or she looks at things and wonders what is in the car and how they can improve how it works. ... They must have an aptitude in math and physical sciences, and for and interest in computer applications and design. ... Wordcount: 537 Pages: 2
DNA
DNA is a thin, chainlike molecule found on every living cell on earth. It directs the formation, growth, and reproduction of cells and organisms. DNA is found in mainly within a cell"s nucleus, in structures called chromosomes. DNA consists of thousands of smaller chemical units (nucleotides). There are four DNA bases: Adenine, Guanine, Thymine, and Cytosine. "The exact amount of each nucleotide and the order in which they"re arranged are unique for every kind of living thing and that ... DNA without a doubt is probably one of the greatest wonders most important to the existence of life. ... "DNA has helped science advance in multiple ways and society as well" ( Carroll, 659, 1997 ). ... Wordcount: 541 Pages: 2 Bibliography
Victorian Doubt in God
Doubt in God was a prevalent theme among Victorian writers. "In Characteristics", Thomas Carlyle discusses the same doubt in God that Tennyson feels in In Memoriam 82, a doubt that characteristically reflects religion in England under the reign of Queen Victoria. Carlyle doubts man"s beliefs because he understands man"s insignificance in the realm of things and thus wonders how any of man"s answers to any questions of the world could be right. He doubts many things especially God. To Carlyl ... Carlyle doubts man"s beliefs because he understands man"s insignificance in the realm of things and thus wonders how any of man"s answers to any questions of the world could be right. ... In a characteristically Victorian manner, Tennyson combines a deep interest in contemporary science with an unorthodox, even idiosyncratic, Christian belief. In Memoriam A.H.H., which he wrote between 1833 and 1850 contains his most important confrontations with contemporary science, particularly with geology and biology. ... Organized religion had simply been bested in performing that function by the natu... Wordcount: 1298 Pages: 5
Matter (philosophical, religious, and scientific views)
What exactly is matter, it is not an every day question that one asks one"s own self. When looked at there are many different views on this subject, however because of the numerous numbers of different views, it is only possible to look at three of the discourses. The three discourses of matter to be looked at are; the Religious, Scientific, and Philosophical. Each discourse has evolved through time into the views that we know, and accept today. The distinction between these views on matter d ... This place being ancient Greece; it was their belief in gods that brought about religion, philosophy, and then science. ... Science for many centuries has been accompanied by philosophical thought, throughout time the mixture of the two is very evident. The beginnings of western science, namely physics, coincide with that of the first period of Greek philosophers. ... In 1905 Einstein changed the world of science with his two theories which started modern physics. ... The science view of emptiness is that there are no empty spaces. ... Wordcount: 2752 Pages: 11
San Antonio (Description)
Have you ever wanted to go to a city that is full of history, friendly people, great to visit, and most of all, beautiful at any time of the year? Well than, San Antonio, Texas is the perfect place to visit. San Antonio has many great things to offer and places to see to suit anybody"s taste. Six Flags Fiesta Texas has so many rides and attractions to fit anyone"s needs. My favorite, and I am sure yours too, is roller coasters. Fiesta Texas has 7 hair-raising roller coaster rides to inclu ... One of these places that you would definitely want to visit is a science museum called The Witte Museum. The Witte features history and science exhibits, major national traveling exhibits, family events, live gallery theater, and overnight camp-ins for children. ... While you are there don't miss the H-E-B Science Tree-house also located on the museum grounds! This four-level science center features hands-on exhibits for all ages, an Internet surfing room, live demonstrations, a real tree-house connected by elevated walkways, and outdoor water exhibits on the banks of the San Antonio Ri... Wordcount: 1255 Pages: 5
Genetic Engineering 2
Genetic Technology and the betterment of our world What exactly is genetic engineering? A simple definition of genetic engineering is "the ability to isolate DNA pieces that contain selected genes of other species"(Muench 238). Genetic engineering has been the upcoming field of biology since the early nineteen seventies. The prosperous field has benefits for both the medical and also the agricultural field. The diminishing of diseases, especially congenital disorders, reduction of pollu ... Some of scientist ideals of how to alter this new science to create the perfect human does in-fact sound crazy. But if genetic engineering was regulated to prevent such things the new science could bring wonders to many peoples lives. ... Sometimes the change is for the betterment of society such as vitro fertilization, insulin, or finding the cure for a fatal disease, but sometimes science goes to far and has the power to damage society in some of the negative types of genetic engineering. ... Science can either help or destroy our world. ... Wordcount: 1184 Pages: 5