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Home » Importance Of Water Resources (57 Papers)

The Importance and Wonders of Mountains
The Importance Of Mountains Introduction "Mountain is the beginning and the end of all the natural scenery" Mountain are god given physical features found both on the land and in the sea(even on other planets). We cannot always measure their importance in terms of animals. Natural habitat for animals Allowing a fair distribution of wild life, they are also a natural sanctuary for some animals. There are certain areas, where the grip of man cannot reach. On the top there are birds and ins ... The Importance Of Mountains Introduction "Mountain is the beginning and the end of all the natural scenery" Mountain are god given physical features found both on the land and in the sea(even on other planets). We cannot always measure their importance in terms of animals. ... Natural resources(trees, timber, water) Mountain Stream harness to provide water power to produce electricity. ... Wordcount: 491 Pages: 2
The Total World Population
Will the World Starve? Looking out a window upon a barren desert, a dry wasteland unfolds as a carpet to nowhere. Abandoned cities dot the horizon, as the ruins speak volumes to the once populated extravagance of a country which lived on wealth and opportunity. The vision just described is not one out of a Hollywood movie script, but one that is not only possible but probable. Currently, the world population numbers over six billion, with China alone cradling over one-sixth of th ... Considering the little amount of available farmland, it should be expected that there would be more of an effort to conserve this vital resource, but unfortunately the issue has not yet risen to a level of global importance. ... Water, used for the irrigation of the world"s life giving crops, contains naturally dissolved minerals and over time the minerals from the irrigated water supply collect in the topsoil. ... Numerous scientists have speculated that many of the world"s natural resources used to support current life such as clean water and air, gasoline, oil, and even coal will almo... Wordcount: 1294 Pages: 5
Views of Thomas Robert Malthus
The question over-population and the reduction in resources is a subject that has assumed contemporary importance, particularly with regard to less developed countries. This situation has also resulted in a resurgence of the Malthusian view that formal measures such as birth control and other methods should be used to reduce increasing populations. This paper will attempt to show that while a problem does exist in less developed countries the Malthusian view is too simplistic and ignores other ... The question over-population and the reduction in resources is a subject that has assumed contemporary importance, particularly with regard to less developed countries. ... In this country with a fertility rate of 4.3 in 2002, "...a substantial share of poverty is also traceable to rapid population growth pressing upon limited endowments of soils and clean water." (Motavalli, 2004, p.26) The statistics also point to the fact that there is a disparity between sustainable population growth and resources. ... India has an increasingly high birth rate and it is estimated that while the population... Wordcount: 1509 Pages: 6 Bibliography
Generation Now
Human population is on a rapid growth. As human population continues to grow so quickly, the environments natural resources are going to be at a high risk of depletion. Therefore, the ecological sustainability is in question. We as humans are not taking this matter seriously. Do we really think there is just an endless supply of natural resources that we can just keep reproducing so rapidly without consequences? Absolutely not! We will be discussing how human population is becoming an environmen ... Another area where humans learned from the animal kingdom is the importance of moving with the seasons, or moving to best provide for their species. ... Population Policy, "one of the most fundamental aspects of the impact of population growth on the political and economic well-being of the globe is its relationship to food, natural resources and water". ... The world's fresh water supply is fixed. ... The shortage of water isn't something we should be taking lightly. ... The rapid growth of human population and its effect on interconnected network of food chains, water supply and av... Wordcount: 2928 Pages: 12 Bibliography
On Sustaining Community Despite Rapid Technological Growth
Not until the spread of the Industrial Revolution in the late nineteenth century, has man possessed the ability to adversely alter, on a global scale, the geologic and climatic cycles that have existed for millennia. Planet earth, which man calls home, is approximately 5 billion years old. The science of paleontology tells us that man is a relative new comer to the planet. Modern man did not arrive on the scene until approximately 10,000 to 15,000 years ago. Developments in hunting, agriculture, ... We are depleting resources and altering ecosystems at an alarming rate. ... This increased consumption and burning of fossil fuels increases air and water pollution and contributes to the greenhouse effect. ... The paved area around all homes reduces rainfall percolation back to ground water tables. ... Arguably, the most important weapon against those that would pollute our air, water, and food sources is an educated citizenry. ... Once people understand the negative impact their decisions have on their environment and the importance of changing their lifestyles, their wiliness to change to m... Wordcount: 1391 Pages: 6
Ways to Prevent Thermal Pollution
Recently, as a result of the increased energy demand, we've allowed our planet to begin overheating. With the introduction of more and more heated water into our lakes and rivers, and Carbon Dioxide into the atmosphere we've managed to raise the temperature of this vast resource. Even more ignorant is our failure to learn from our mistakes. Now, through thermal pollution (the introduction of waste heat into water and air), we've begun destroying the womb of all life: the earth's vast water netwo ... Thus, the water temperature is raised. ... Both of which increase the water's temperature. ... Developing countries have far fewer resources for adapting to such changes. ... One way to understand the importance of the speed of change is to think about native plants that grow in North America. ... The water vapor exchanges heat with colder cooling water, thus condensing to form distilled water. ... Wordcount: 1200 Pages: 5
Evaluation of Peter Singer's Thoughts: The Animal Protectionist
Animal production as a means for food and clothing has long been a practice that humans have performed for thousands of years. Today, more than ever, the issue on whether or not conduct of mistreatment is actively occurring in agriculture is passionately being debated. Those that oppose animal cruelty protest the destructive means of "production" at a cost of millions of animals each year. Some of the processes that slaughter houses, animal protectionists say, are unnecessary. On the other ha ... Peter Singer, author of Animal Liberation, emphasizes the importance of animal realization and the notion that humans are not the only ones on this planet deserves life and liberty. ... Meat production puts a strain on many resources such as water, energy, and the soil itself. ... In both arguments, Singer Illustrates the destructiveness that occurs to our resources that will ultimately affect us. Morally, we all must consider the extremities of ravaging our land and take action to conserve our resources. ... One of these protectionists, Peter Singer, author of Animal Liberation, empha... Wordcount: 1776 Pages: 7
Theoritical Analysis on Julius Caesar's Life
Julius Caesar was undoubtedly a man who changed history. His life and its story have inspired generations of awe and scrupulous study. Many would argue he is the most influential man in recorded history. However, can the great Caesar truly be declared a 'event-making man", according to the criteria of the Great Man Theory? Did he truly influence the course of history through his own extraordinary acts of will and leadership? Or was he simply a fortunate man who appeared in the right place ... Caesar immediately recognized the importance of speech, and what role it would play in his destiny. ... As aforementioned, Caesar was unique because of his bravery, ingenuity, and of utmost importance, his determination5. ... The battle was almost lost when Achillas cut off the Roman"s water supply. His army ready to retreat, Caesar quickly ordered the digging of deep wells which more than compensated for the previous lack of water. ... His ingenuity lead him to use his soldiers and other resources in ways never previously thought of. ... Wordcount: 1738 Pages: 7
Analysis on The "Western and European Miracle"
The Industrial Revolution It has, been variously called the "Western Miracle" (Rosenberg and Birdzell 42) and the "European Miracle," (Jones) but it is commonly known as the Industrial Revolution. Subsequent to the Middle Ages, populations in Western Europe began developing technology that enhanced their ability to generate products and which led to significantly higher standards of living than populations elsewhere on the planet. It should be noted that this does not suggest that the qu ... Possession of natural resources has also been put forth as a possible answer. Unfortunately, natural resources do not become economic assets until the knowledge and means of using them (technology) becomes available. ... Drought is also more severe in Asia than in Europe, with severe effects on the crops, often water-intensive, such as rice (Jones 28). ... The Thames provided good water communication upstream, and, via the open sea, along the coast and with Europe. ... London was uniquely placed to take advantage of receiving heavy bulky goods by water, or lighter, more valuable goods by ... Wordcount: 2442 Pages: 10
The Environmental Problem Acid Rain
Acid Rain Introduction Acid rain has become an environmental concern of global importance within the last decade. With the increasing environmental awareness of the "unhealthy" condition of our planet earth the concern about acid rain has not lessened. In brief, acid rain is rain with pH values of less than 5.6. When dealing with acid rain one must study and understand the process of making Sulfuric acid. In this project we will take an in depth look into the production of sulfuric acid, some o ... Acid Rain Introduction Acid rain has become an environmental concern of global importance within the last decade. ... Whether there is sufficient energy resources readily available; e. ... Elaborate commission proof container are required for the transportation of sulfuric acid while sulfur can be much more easily transported by truck or railway car. 3) Human Resources For a sulfuric acid plant to operate, a large work force will obviously be required. ... This then reacts with water to produce sulfuric acid. ... iii) The use of sodium hydroxide versus limestone to neutralize the lake water:... Wordcount: 3143 Pages: 13
Sulfuric Acid Industry
Acid Rain Introduction Acid rain has become an environmental concern of global importance within the last decade. With the increasing environmental awareness of the "unhealthy" condition of our planet earth the concern about acid rain has not lessened. In brief, acid rain is rain with pH values of less than 5.6. When dealing with acid rain one must study and understand the process of making Sulfuric acid. In this project we will take an in depth look into the production of sulfuric acid, s ... Acid Rain Introduction Acid rain has become an environmental concern of global importance within the last decade. ... Whether there is sufficient energy resources readily available; e. ... Elaborate commission proof container are required for the transportation of sulfuric acid while sulfur can be much more easily transported by truck or railway car. 3) Human Resources For a sulfuric acid plant to operate, a large work force will obviously be required. ... This then reacts with water to produce sulfuric acid. ... iii) The use of sodium hydroxide versus limestone to neutralize the lake w... Wordcount: 3105 Pages: 12
Columbia River Treaty
The Columbia River Treaty The Columbia River Treaty: was it a benefit or a rip off to the Canadian people? Although it has been argued both ways, my position is that the deal struck benefited the US and adversely affected British Columbia. While we did receive money from the US for the sale of electricity, this money does not adequately compensate for the loss of the benefits derived from actual water usage. I hope to inform the readers of the importance of this treaty, why it was controvers ... I hope to inform the readers of the importance of this treaty, why it was controversial, as well as look at the political, environmental and economical factors that affected and influenced people's opinions of the value of this treaty. ... This view point is shared by, John Krutilla, who was well respected in the hydroelectric field, and who was retained by the United States Resources' for the Future Corporation. ... They did not consider the value of giving away control of the water and the value of the actual water usage. ... Why is all this water so important to the United St... Wordcount: 1598 Pages: 6
Management of the BLM's public land system
Management of the BLM's Public Lands System The government has control of over one-third of the nation's land, and 398 million acres of that is controlled by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM 6). This land holds a wide diversity of resources, from timber and grazing lands found on the surface, to a mass of oil, natural gas, and minerals lying below the earth. The history of these lands is hardly a dull story, because it is the story of the taming of the "Wild West". Should the BLM though, ... This land holds a wide diversity of resources, from timber and grazing lands found on the surface, to a mass of oil, natural gas, and minerals lying below the earth. ... This topic is of importance to park and recreation professionals because it will directly effect how the lands that they are using for parks, are going to be used. ... Public lands, wildlife and fisheries resources are important to the American Economy. ... For instance, wetland habitat improvements for wildlife also improve water flow and water quality for downstream users. ... Since rangelands account for nearly 162 mill... Wordcount: 2156 Pages: 9
The Large Hidden Cost in Recycling
Can We Say "NO" To Recycling Lately the earth"s capacity to tolerate exploitation and absorb solid wastes disposal has diminished, due to excess trashing. People dispose lots of stuff, and simply do not care. Therefore scientists found out a way to reuse things and that process was called "recycling". This new approach seemed quite successful at the beginning, until its true identity appeared. Recycling first started as man"s best friend, people were intrigued by this new phenomena. What could ... Although recycling of wastes material solves the problem of garbage disposal at landfills, and saves resources, it does nevertheless entail large hidden costs in collecting, sorting and manufacturing; therefore, it is necessary for the go! ... Beside, these landfills pollute their surroundings area with lots of hazardous materials and contaminate underground water. To discover the contamination of the underground water it would be 12 yeas after the poisons-benzene; formaldehyde; mercury; and BCEE- have actually contaminated the land, and had sunk 24 feet into the ground contaminating about 5... Wordcount: 2426 Pages: 10
Recycling Process
Lately the earth s capacity to tolerate exploitation and absorb solid wastes disposal has diminished, due to excess trashing. People dispose lots of stuff, and simply do not care. Therefore scientists found out a way to reuse things and that process was called "recycling". This new approach seemed quite successful at the beginning, until its true identity appeared. Recycling first started as man s best friend, people were intrigued by this new phenomena. What could be better than using things th ... Although recycling of wastes material solves the problem of garbage disposal at landfills, and saves resources, it does nevertheless entail large hidden costs in collecting, sorting and manufacturing; therefore, it is necessary for the go! ... Beside, these landfills pollute their surroundings area with lots of hazardous materials and contaminate underground water. To discover the contamination of the underground water it would be 12 yeas after the poisons-benzene; formaldehyde; mercury; and BCEE- have actually contaminated the land, and had sunk 24 feet into the ground contaminating about 5... Wordcount: 2425 Pages: 10
Paper on the Relationship Between Environment and Fine Arts
Art and the nature of time This paper will show the relationship between the environment and fine arts. Both of these subjects are evaluated on a perceptual basis of what the observer sees and appreciates. As the basis for this report, it will be determined what is considered art and what comprises the environment. Defining what is art has been discussed at least since Plato wrote in The Republic about the place of the artist in society. The importance of art to mankind has peculiarly modern i ... The importance of art to mankind has peculiarly modern implications since only in the past few hundred years has any need been felt to justify or explain art as a significant aspect of human experience. ... "Trends in social organization and theory, in religion, philosophy, and ethics, alter men"s views about the functions and values of art and about the relative importance of past artists and their works. ... This illustrates the energy wasting nature of our present day society in which the United States, with only 6 per cent of the world"s population, used 35 per cent of the world"s ... Wordcount: 2113 Pages: 8
BRICS: Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa
In the economic world, BRICS is a grouping acronym that refers to the countries of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. These countries are all known to be at the beginning of newly advanced economic development. The acronym was created by Jim O'Neill in a 2001 paper entitled "Building Better Global Economic - BRICS". The acronym has come into worldwide use as a symbol of the shift in global economic power away from the developed G7 economies towards the developing world. G7 countries ... With newly discovered oil reserves under miles of water, rock and shifting salt, Brazil has approximately 500 miles of oil and petroleum off the Atlantic coastline. ... The company is recognized as a leader in offshore drilling technology and deep water wells. ... The reason of its importance is that ethanol is produced through natural resources. ... Wordcount: 1797 Pages: 7
The Ecotourism in Latin America
Paradise: Gained or Lost? The word ecotourism has not been around for that many years. However it is a word that has briskly become suitable for hotels and tourist attractions alike. This statement can not be more proper to say pertaining to Latin American countries, primarily Costa Rica, which has a high rate of international tourism. Ecotourism is not a word that everyone understands. It is a term that could have multiple meanings. When it comes down to it, though, there are two t ... Its area totals 51,000 square miles, of which only 440 are water due to the extensive mountains dominating the majority of the country"s area. ... This direction presents geographers, environmentalists, politicians, and economists with the plague of overwhelming tasks in preventing the destruction of Costa Rica"s environment, society, culture, and natural resources. ... Meaning they set out to remote areas attracted by the beautiful environment, recreational and sporting resources, and culture. ... In addition, they both consume resources. ... In contrast, the country"s mai... Wordcount: 2522 Pages: 10
Richard Wright's "Eight Men"
In Richard Wright's "Eight Men"", I enjoyed the themes that consistently referred to white supremacy and the never ending struggle that all African American's must endure in order to truly earn their freedom. The main story that caught my eye in reference to this theme was "The Man who saw the Flood"". The emphasis exhibited by Wright towards the black family's necessity to begin again even after all their struggles and successes is evident throughout the writing. This creates the theme that no ... The importance of this is to show that while, Burgess is a white man, has also been affected by this flood. ... This represents that while the tree is indeed affected by the mud caused by this flood, it may be able to endure the circumstances more easily compared to the blade of grass, due to the amount of resources it has at its whim. ... On the other hand, the African American family is going to struggle to even return from debt, simply because they don't possess half the resources that the white man does. ... The metaphoric flood could be representative of segregation, sitting on the b... Wordcount: 1055 Pages: 4
The Three Types of Coral Reefs
The report that you are about to read is about coral reefs, their habitats, and the problems that they are facing. I chose coral reefs for my project because I have always been interested in marine biology, and I am a fan of the ocean as well. As what you are about to read explains, coral reefs are in danger of extinction. Hopefully, man will realize what he has done to them and decide to take care of and protect them. I hope you enjoy my essay. Coral reefs are arguably the world"s most beautif ... Fringing reefs are located close to shore, separated from land by only shallow water. ... There are four environmental factors that effect their growth: temperature, salinity, water depth, and wave action. ... Another example during 1982-83, The El Nino event, during which unusually warm water flowed from South America"s Pacific Coast. ... In conclusion, coral reefs are some of the most useful resources on the planet. ... Such as their value to us, what we can obtain from them, and overall, the importance of them. ... Wordcount: 1469 Pages: 6
The Impact of the Plague on European Culture
The impact of the plague on European culture To properly understand the impact of the plague and the historical marks it left it is necessary to consider all aspects of society. The Bubonic Plague otherwise known as the "Black Death" was responsible for the deaths of over 25 million people reducing the population of Europe by one third. Originating in Asia the plague swept through Europe between 1347 and 1350 spread by the Black Rat carrying the oriental flea in its coat. The term "Black De ... Without sufficient resources landowners were unable to efficiently farm their land and many were unable to sustain their livelihoods. ... However these inexperienced entrepreneurs faced the same problems with shortages of human resources. This need resulted in the development of new technologies based on wind and water power which were to replace human resources thus aiding industry in its time of crisis, in some ways foreshadowing the industrial revolution. ... Far more social emphasis was placed upon the importance of death and the afterlife. ... Wordcount: 1628 Pages: 7
The Implications of Technology and the Global Ecosystem
Review and Discussion Background and Overview. In her essay, "Gaia: Gender and Scientific Representations of the Earth," Marcia Bjornerud (1997) reports that, "Few ideas have provoked more rancorous debate within the modern scientific community than the Gaia hypothesis-the proposal that the Earth can be viewed as a superorganism with the capacity to regulate its "body" chemistry and temperature" (89). Although the concept of the Earth as a living being is ancient, the formal scientific deve ... An approximate assessment of the four major human requirements for existence indicates that the current appropriation of natural resources and services has already exceeded the global ecosystem"s long-term carrying capacity. ... That is to say, the draw-down on the planet"s natural resources exceeds the sustainability level by one-third (emphasis added) (Kennedy 132). ... Still other examples of broad ecosystem degradation include the hypoxic "dead zones" located in the Gulf of Mexico as well as other bodies of water around the world, the rapid decline of the Black Sea fisheries as a resu... Wordcount: 2588 Pages: 10 Bibliography
The Evolving Role of Government Financial Executives
Introduction For most parts of history, government financial executives have been taken as scorekeepers, and made responsible for collecting, processing and reporting the financial information that used by elected officials and senior managers who use them in making their decisions. The question is whether their role has now changed with the present importance of information technology. (From Scorekeeper to Business Partner: The Evolving Role of Government Financial Executives) Analysis No ... The question is whether their role has now changed with the present importance of information technology. ... The importance of these executives is in the fact that they represent their association at official ceremonies. (State and provincial representatives (Profiling GFOA)) The importance of financial officers is being increasingly recognized and in the preface to the GAAFR 2005, which is the set of guidelines to be followed. ... This can be understood by looking at the general fund balance sheet and the total requirement checked and the collected resources should exceed the requirements.... Wordcount: 2917 Pages: 12 Bibliography
United Kingdom of Britain and Northern Ireland
GREAT BRITAIN Great Britain is made up of three countries, England, Scotland and Wales. It is an island off the coast of north-west of Europe. Britain is part of the United Kingdom of Britain and Northern Ireland. The capital is London. Relief There are many different landscapes in Britain, from high mountains to rolling hill sand valleys. Places like Wales, the Lake District and northwest Scotland have high mountains and steep slopes made out of solid rocks. This landscape was made m ... Britain"s rivers provide drinking water for towns, and irrigate farmers" crops. ... This is because southwesterly winds bring water from the Atlantic Ocean to the west, which falls as rain where it meets the mountains on land. There are large amounts of water in this area and a shortage in the south and the east. ... Soil England England has some agricultural and mineral resources but must rely on imports of both. ... Britain is trying to rebuild its economy by regaining its political importance. ... Wordcount: 1780 Pages: 7
Dynamic and Increasing Rate of Population
World population, which reached 5.4 billion in mid-1991, is growing faster than ever before: three people every second, more than 250,000 every day. At the beginning of the decade (1991) the annual addition was 93 million; by the end (1998) it will approach 100 million. At this rate the world will have almost a billion more people (roughly the population of China) by the year 2001. Population and development are closely aligned. In Population: A Megalopolis is Born, Melvy ... Implications The Brundtland Commission (1987) suggests the population is about not just numbers of people, but how those numbers relate to available resources. ... It is only when we relate population data to a particular context can we appreciate its importance on future and global development. ... „h Over-fishing is experienced „h Aquifers are tapped which can replenish only gradually „h Fuel needs drive deforestation and greater use of non-renewable mineral resources, and „h Increased water pollution becomes the product of agricultural run off, sewage, et... Wordcount: 1562 Pages: 6