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Home » Importance Of Water Resources (184 Papers)

The Importance of Water Resources
Water is singly the most important element to the world as a whole. It is the lifeblood of the environment, essential to the survival of all living things whether it is a plant, an animal or humans (Environment Canada, 1996). It is a powerful resource that we cannot afford to live without, so we mu ... The destruction of the world's waters will ultimately lead to the destruction of the planet because without the very source for life, life cannot sustain itself.Our water resources are of such a great importance because water itself is responsible for so many things in life that it would be absolutely impossible to continue on without it. ... Other reasons why water is of such importance to us is because of its use as the "universal solvent." ... Finally, water is of such importance because of its large involved in the earth's mechanics. ... The pollution of our fresh water resources... Wordcount: 2677 Pages: 11
ground water pollution
Ground water is the water found in spaces between soil particles and rocks, and within cracks of the bedrock. Some ground water can be found beneath the land surface in most of the US. Because of its availability and general good quality, ground water is widely used for household needs and other purposes. Ground water is found in natural rock formations, which are called aquifers. For the most part, ground water comes directly from precipitation or surface water that infiltrates below the la ... Ground water is the water found in spaces between soil particles and rocks, and within cracks of the bedrock. ... The remaining water, called recharge water, drains down through the soil to the saturated zone, where water fills all the spaces between soil particles and rocks. ... Water continues to move within the saturated zone from areas where the water table is higher toward areas where the water table is lower. ... Ground water is an important component of our nation"s fresh water resources. The use of ground water is of fundamental importance to human life and is also significant to ... Wordcount: 1923 Pages: 8
Mike Cain
MICHAEL CAIN Michael Cain is an attorney for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) and he came to talk to us about the evolution of the public trust doctrine in Wisconsin dealing with navigable water and current development issues related to the public trust. The doctrine states that a sizable body of common law has developed which holds that all navigable waters are held in trust by the state for the public and through the DNR Department of Justice and District Attorneys the ... MICHAEL CAIN Michael Cain is an attorney for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) and he came to talk to us about the evolution of the public trust doctrine in Wisconsin dealing with navigable water and current development issues related to the public trust. ... With the increase in recreational and developmental pressures the amount of aquatic resources diminishes increasing the importance of this issue and the grounds of the public trust doctrine. This is important because the doctrine provides the foundation for preserving aquatic natural resources for the future. ... Wordcount: 584 Pages: 2
Salmon
Salmon The preservation of natural habitats is of capital importance to the preservation of the species it holds. The preservation of wild rivers and streams are the key to avoid the salmon"s extinction. The salmons" struggle for survival is a humongous one, and it is practically condemned to its failure, and finally, to extinction. The body of water, which is absolutely necessary for the salmon to get to its final destination, is so shallo ... Salmon The preservation of natural habitats is of capital importance to the preservation of the species it holds. ... Population should grow accordingly to its available resources to avoid the over exploitation of its natural resources. ... It is true that we need the water to drink and to survive, but we are killing the species by taking water from natural resources in large quantities. We need to take into consideration that the species living in those natural habitats we take the water from need that water to survive too. ... My hope is to make my wife, friends and dau... Wordcount: 735 Pages: 3
Wetlands - Why We Need Them
WETLANDS: AN INTRODUCTION "Wetlands", according to a description found at North Carolina State University"s website, is the collective term for marshes, swamps, bogs, and similar areas. Wetlands are found in flat vegetated areas, in depressions on the landscape, and between water and dry land along the edges of streams, rivers, lakes, and coastlines. Wetland areas can be found in nearly every county and climatic zone in the United States. Inland wetlands receive water from precipitation, grou ... Inland wetlands receive water from precipitation, ground water and/or surface water. Coastal and estuarine wetlands receive water from precipitation, surface water, tides, and/or ground water. ... IMPORTANCE OF WETLANDS FUNCTIONS AND VALUES Many people use the terms functions and values interchangeably when discussing wetlands, even though functions and values are different. ... Values are "an estimate, usually subjective, of worth, merit, quality, or importance" (Richardson 1994). ... Wetlands store precipitation and surface water and then slowly release the water into associated surface ... Wordcount: 3432 Pages: 14 Bibliography
The Importance of Mountains
The Importance Of MountainsIntroduction"Mountain is the beginning and the end of all the natural scenery" Mountain are god given physical features found both on the land and in the sea(even on other planets). We cannot always measure their importance in terms of animals.Natural habitat for animalsAl ... The Importance Of MountainsIntroduction"Mountain is the beginning and the end of all the natural scenery" Mountain are god given physical features found both on the land and in the sea(even on other planets). We cannot always measure their importance in terms of animals.Natural habitat for animalsAllowing a fair distribution of wild life, they are also a natural sanctuary for some animals. ... Mountains offering challenges to some people.Natural resources(trees, timber, water)Mountain Stream harness to provide water power to produce electricity. ... Wordcount: 491 Pages: 2
food problem
The population of human beings had been showing a rapid increasing during the past several hundred years due to the adequate food supply and the top position where human species is in the food chain. However, many people are concerned about that one day the Mother Earth may not be able to provide adequate food for the increasing population on the Earth, as the number of people is growing unlimitedly. After reading the article, I realized that the food problem created by rapid increasing populati ... However, I believe that because the natural resources is limited, sooner or later there won¡t be enough food for all people on Earth. ... We should have better ways to use the limited resource on Earth such as lands and water. ... By using the existing resources more efficiently, we can increase the amount of food that can be produced. ... Today most population grows very fast in developing countries because people in those areas don¡t understand the importance of birth control. ... Once the people learn about the importance and advantages to have fewer children, they will always follow the... Wordcount: 575 Pages: 2
Environmental Regulations not cheap
Microeconomics In Shankar Gupta"s article, "Environmental Regulations not Cheap," he argues that further action taken by environmentalist causes, burden business activity, family incomes, developing countries, and also that there is no feasible way to enforce global laws to protect the environment. Well, I agree with those statements, and I believe that there is truth to what he is saying. However, I simply view the matter differently than Mr. Gupta. I believe that the opportunity cost ... I was taken back by how little the government spends on the environment, considering our GDP, and I do not believe that 263 billion dollars in projected costs to American business for the environment is the issue that has most importance. ... Simple regulation would seem to me as the very least that could be expected from the government, representing the people who have to breath, and use our water sources. ... Gupta compares paying extra for clean air and clean water to luxury goods that we might chose to buy if we have excess money. ... One of the focuses of economics, is how to allocate ... Wordcount: 743 Pages: 3
Will the World Starve1
Will the World Starve? Looking out a window upon a barren desert, a dry wasteland unfolds as a carpet to nowhere. Abandoned cities dot the horizon, as the ruins speak volumes to the once populated extravagance of a country which lived on wealth and opportunity. The vision just described is not one out of a Hollywood movie script, but one that is not only possible but probable. Currently, the world population numbers over six billion, with China alone cradling over one-sixth of th ... Considering the little amount of available farmland, it should be expected that there would be more of an effort to conserve this vital resource, but unfortunately the issue has not yet risen to a level of global importance. ... Water, used for the irrigation of the world"s life giving crops, contains naturally dissolved minerals and over time the minerals from the irrigated water supply collect in the topsoil. ... Numerous scientists have speculated that many of the world"s natural resources used to support current life such as clean water and air, gasoline, oil, and even coal will almo... Wordcount: 1294 Pages: 5
Will the World Starve
Will the World Starve? Looking out a window upon a barren desert, a dry wasteland unfolds as a carpet to nowhere. Abandoned cities dot the horizon, as the ruins speak volumes to the once populated extravagance of a country which lived on wealth and opportunity. The vision just described is not one out of a Hollywood movie script, but one that is not only possible but probable. Currently, the world population numbers over six billion, with China alone cradling over one-sixth of th ... Considering the little amount of available farmland, it should be expected that there would be more of an effort to conserve this vital resource, but unfortunately the issue has not yet risen to a level of global importance. ... Water, used for the irrigation of the world"s life giving crops, contains naturally dissolved minerals and over time the minerals from the irrigated water supply collect in the topsoil. ... Numerous scientists have speculated that many of the world"s natural resources used to support current life such as clean water and air, gasoline, oil, and even coal will almo... Wordcount: 1294 Pages: 5
Lewis and Clark Expedition
Lewis and Clark Expedition The Lewis and Clark Expedition was the first exploration by the United States government of the northwestern wilderness. This expedition, which was led by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, began in 1804 and lasted more than two years. Lewis and Clark started up the Missouri River from St. Louis and traveled almost 7,700 miles to the Pacific Coast. They returned with maps of the frontier and information about the region"s natural resources and the Indian tribes who ... They returned with maps of the frontier and information about the region"s natural resources and the Indian tribes who lived there. ... Here are some important words that Jefferson said to emphasize the importance of the mission: " The object of your mission is to explore the Missouri River and such principal stream of it as by it"s course and communication with the waters of the Pacific Ocean, whether the Columbia, Oregon, Colorado, or any other river may offer the most direct and practicable water communication across this continent for the purpose of commerce.... For twenty years,... Wordcount: 468 Pages: 2
The General Description of A Wetland Environment
The Wetland Environment I. Importance of the Wetland Environment a.One of the most important things about the wetlands is flood control, ''the world's natural sponges''. b.Other importances of the wetlands that involve water are water purification ... Importance of the Wetland Environment a.One of the most important things about the wetlands is flood control, ''the world's natural sponges''. b.Other importances of the wetlands that involve water are water purification, and hydroelectric damns. ... Most plants are emergants(grow out of the water. ... d.Rivers and Streams-flowing water and currents. ... Natural Resources Conservation Service. ... Wordcount: 822 Pages: 3 Bibliography
Deforesation
Imagine a place where there are more kinds of plants and animals than anyone has ever seen, a place filled with mysteries and marvels, surprising sights and strange sounds. Such a place really exists. It is called a tropical rainforest, and it is found in many countries around the world. Tropical rainforests are where you come across armies of ants, bird-eating spiders, giant earthworms, and squawking parrots, along with snakes gliding through the air. How exciting it would be to explore. ... Tropical forests have environmental and socioeconomic importance in the world today. ... Forests regulate stream flows by intercepting rainfall, absorbing the water into the underlying soil, and gradually releasing it into the streams and rivers of its watershed. ... Substantial tropical forest management expertise is deployed through bilateral aid programs as well, and resources to this sector have recently been significantly increased. ... TFAP initiated national forestry action planning on an unprecedented scale, raised public awareness of the impacts of deforestation, and captured subst... Wordcount: 2141 Pages: 9 Bibliography
Globalization
Globalization "People around the globe are more connected to each other than ever before. Information and money flow more quickly than ever. Goods and services produced in one part of the world are increasingly available in all parts of the world. International travel is more frequent. International communication is commonplace. This phenomenon has been titled "globalization." Globalization is the process of denationalization of markets, politics and legal systems." (globalization.about.com ... " (World Issues Notes, "United Nations Human Development Report") "20% of the worlds population, (the consumer class) consumed over 80% of the world"s resources, that leaves 8 out of 10 people worldwide, with access to only 20% of the world"s energy, food, and financial resources.... "(Canada and the World Pg 16) "The United Nations estimates that the additional cost of achieving universal access to basic education, health care, reproductive health care for all women, and adequate food, safe water and sanitation for every person on this planet is roughly $40 bil... Wordcount: 721 Pages: 3
Importance Of Rome
Rome Was Important Although many civilizations came and went throughout time Rome came and stayed, and stayed for a very long time. The Roman people were innovative, interesting and good at what they did. From politics to architecture to social life, they left behind many changes and innovations that are with us today and will be in the future. Ancient Rome is gone, but it is hard to imagine that for 10 times the years that America has been an organized country that Rome was the center of th ... The arch is the first of many inventions by Romans including columns, domes, concrete and water control. ... Rome survived for many reasons for 2,000 years but one of the main ones was its great natural resources and natural barriers. ... The way these resources were taken advantage of and the blunders Rome made helped shape countless cities since. ... Wordcount: 565 Pages: 2
california population
The population of California is expected to increase by more than 15 million people by the year 2020. This is not a new startling fact. It has been said many times before, in many different ways. This number is equivalent to the present population of Arizona, Nevada, Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming and Colorado combined. Carol Whiteside focuses on how the population boom will affect California's cities. She also looks at how the cities will prepare for such growth, with local resources that are alrea ... Another large focus is on preserving the natural resources and farmland as we expand rapidly. ... Instead, the focus should be on transit systems, roads, schools, parks, libraries, and sewer and water systems within developed areas. Protect Farmland, Open Space and Natural Resources Ongoing support is needed for the state's agricultural land stewardship program, local land trusts and other programs that protect farmland open space and natural resources. The state should ensure that new development doesn't jeopardize water supplies needed for agriculture, existing urban areas and t... Wordcount: 1885 Pages: 8
The Argument Against Neo-Malthusianism
The question over-population and the reduction in resources is a subject that has assumed contemporary importance, particularly with regard to less developed countries. This situation has also resulted in a resurgence of the Malthusian view that formal measures such as birth control and other methods should be used to reduce increasing populations. This paper will attempt to show that while a problem does exist in less developed countries the Malthusian view is too simplistic and ignores other ... The question over-population and the reduction in resources is a subject that has assumed contemporary importance, particularly with regard to less developed countries. ... In this country with a fertility rate of 4.3 in 2002, "...a substantial share of poverty is also traceable to rapid population growth pressing upon limited endowments of soils and clean water." (Motavalli, 2004, p.26) The statistics also point to the fact that there is a disparity between sustainable population growth and resources. ... India has an increasingly high birth rate and it is estimated that while the population... Wordcount: 1509 Pages: 6 Bibliography
Wetland Preservation
Our nation and planet face many problems. Some are of great immediate significance and others we are just beginning to understand the depth of. The preservation of our nations wetlands seems to fit the second category. This paper will deal with what the author considers to be a three part problem. First, defining wetlands, and explaining the controversy that surrounds them. Second, fixing the legal issues dealing with wetland regulation. Finally, learning how to communicate to ... Although the pace of exploitation of wetland resources perhaps did not parallel that of the felling of virgin timber or the breaking of the prairies, they now constitute one of the last frontiers of unutilized land and, for this reason, are dwindling in acreage faster than any other ecological system. ... There still remains a body of this habitat of sufficient diversity and distribution to support a continental waterfowl population, various fur animals, farm and forest game, and warm-water fish of great economic and social value, as well as a rich natural reservoir of water, irreplace... Wordcount: 1973 Pages: 8
local government in tourism
Local Government has no Role to Play in Tourist Development The local Government is one of the keys to tourism development, a complete contradiction to that of the essay statement, which I believe really has no ground to stand on. In this essay I will illustrate this point by showing the roles with which local government plays within the community, and the importance it has to creating a successfully developed tourism product that maximises the benefits for not only the residences of the comm ... In this essay I will illustrate this point by showing the roles with which local government plays within the community, and the importance it has to creating a successfully developed tourism product that maximises the benefits for not only the residences of the community but the tourist himself. ... Allocate resources in a manner where tourism development is sustainable in the present and into the future. 3. ... It has the ability to allocate its regions scarce resources in a manner which creates sustainable products providing the maximum benefit to the community. ... These are the provisions... Wordcount: 2108 Pages: 8
Deforetsation
Deforestation Today we face the growing concerns about the environment and what we can do to help protect our valuable resources. One of the topics that is currently being heatedly debated is deforestation. We are all affected by the forests and there affect on the environment. A good portion of the products we use are made from or are influenced by trees or other forest organisms. Deforestations main causes are growing population, education, and the commercial timber industry. But there a ... Deforestation Today we face the growing concerns about the environment and what we can do to help protect our valuable resources. ... Today we know better and have slowly started to learn the importance of the world we live in and the impact that we can have on it, for good or bad. ... We need to keep teaching our kids the importance of protecting the earth"s natural resources, and to remain conscious of the effects we have on them. ... Trees also affect the rate of ground water replenishment, and the amount of water that is released in watersheds. ... Even if you don"t live in or aroun... Wordcount: 998 Pages: 4
Generation Now
Human population is on a rapid growth. As human population continues to grow so quickly, the environments natural resources are going to be at a high risk of depletion. Therefore, the ecological sustainability is in question. We as humans are not taking this matter seriously. Do we really think there is just an endless supply of natural resources that we can just keep reproducing so rapidly without consequences? Absolutely not! We will be discussing how human population is becoming an environmen ... Another area where humans learned from the animal kingdom is the importance of moving with the seasons, or moving to best provide for their species. ... Population Policy, "one of the most fundamental aspects of the impact of population growth on the political and economic well-being of the globe is its relationship to food, natural resources and water". ... The world's fresh water supply is fixed. ... The shortage of water isn't something we should be taking lightly. ... The rapid growth of human population and its effect on interconnected network of food chains, water supply and av... Wordcount: 2928 Pages: 12 Bibliography
Overpopulation
The population of the developing sub-Saharan Africa is currently 620 million and is projected to double by 2025, even when taking into account the rising deaths from the Aids virus. At alarming growth rates such in this part of Africa the world is adding a city the size of Los Angeles every two weeks. Africa -meaning sunny without cold -is the second largest continent and is almost split equally in two by the equator. Its northern part has the Sahara desert and two mountainous regions. The south ... The southern part is rich in resources such as gems and fossil fuels. ... With increasing population due to lack of birth control, resources such as water, arable land, and forest coverage are being threatened. ... Currently, 505 million people face water scarcity. ... Imagine living without water. ... It is imperative that all people in the world are aware of the importance of birth control. ... Wordcount: 943 Pages: 4 Bibliography
Mining in Canada
The Importance of Mining Industry The importance of mining is definitely significant to Canada. Mining, is an important industry, and Canadians are very advanced in their mining technology, but during the mining process, there is certain level of pollution produced. The Canadian government and the mining companies have very good plans and controls toward this problem, while ensuring the smooth running of the industries, and also helping to create strong economy and employment. ... The Importance of Mining Industry The importance of mining is definitely significant to Canada. ... Acid rain unquestionably contributed to the acidification of lakes and streams, causing problems with the agricultural crops and forest growth, and has the potential to contaminate drinking water systems 10. ... Mining process, and mineral exploration, requiring access to large areas of lands, if minerals are discovered, mining - especially "open pit" mining - can degrade the immediate environment and have off-property effects on water quality. ... Appendix A Canada: ... Wordcount: 2255 Pages: 9
Toward a Sustainable Community
Not until the spread of the Industrial Revolution in the late nineteenth century, has man possessed the ability to adversely alter, on a global scale, the geologic and climatic cycles that have existed for millennia. Planet earth, which man calls home, is approximately 5 billion years old. The science of paleontology tells us that man is a relative new comer to the planet. Modern man did not arrive on the scene until approximately 10,000 to 15,000 years ago. Developments in hunting, agriculture, ... We are depleting resources and altering ecosystems at an alarming rate. ... This increased consumption and burning of fossil fuels increases air and water pollution and contributes to the greenhouse effect. ... The paved area around all homes reduces rainfall percolation back to ground water tables. ... Arguably, the most important weapon against those that would pollute our air, water, and food sources is an educated citizenry. ... Once people understand the negative impact their decisions have on their environment and the importance of changing their lifestyles, their wiliness to change to m... Wordcount: 1391 Pages: 6
Atomic Bomb
Creation to Destruction The atomic bomb ended a war of massive death and destruction, but began what is now known as the Atomic Age. At the time of the disasters in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the bomb appeared as a promise of peace to the entire world. It had ended a costly and gruesome war, beginning a time of peace. Compared to the technology of 1945, the atomic bomb looked too powerful and unethical ever to be used again. It was seen as the weapon that would put an end to war. In Keith E ... But when Germans learned of the importance of uranium and "heavy water," they started massive production of the water and had it delivered to them. When British intelligence found out about the production of the heavy water, they destroyed the plant. This loss of heavy water played a major role in wrecking Germans' hopes for the atomic bomb. ... "Given the necessary time and resources, however, the Germans would've probably succeeded" (p. 45). ... Joseph Stalin knew of the atomic bomb through secret operations, but he didn't realize the importance of the weapon until it w... Wordcount: 1454 Pages: 6